Contaminated Soil Remediation

A typical soil and/or groundwater remediation system consists of both a vapor extraction system used to extract vapors from the contaminated area and a control device used to control emissions from the vapor extraction system. The types of systems include in-situ soil vapor extraction systems (SVE), ex-situ soil burners, air stripping systems, ex-situ soil aeration, bioremediation projects, contaminated soil excavations, contaminated soil stockpiles, and air pollution control devices for soil and groundwater remediation. 

Soil vapor extraction also known as "soil venting" or "vacuum extraction", is an in-situ remedial technology that reduces concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents adsorbed to soils in the unsaturated (vadose) zone. In this technology, a vacuum is applied through wells near the source of contamination in the soil. Volatile constituents of the contaminant mass "evaporate" and the vapors are drawn toward the extraction wells. Extracted vapor is then treated as necessary (commonly with carbon adsorption or thermal or catalytic oxidation) before being released to the atmosphere.

Air stripping involves the mass transfer of volatile contaminants from water to air. For ground water remediation, this process is typically conducted in a packed tower or an aeration tank. The typical packed tower air stripper includes a spray nozzle at the top of the tower to distribute contaminated water over the packing in the column, a fan to force air countercurrent to the water flow, and a sump at the bottom of the tower to collect decontaminated water. Auxiliary equipment that can be added to the basic air stripper includes an air heater to improve removal efficiencies; automated control systems with sump level switches and safety features, such as differential pressure monitors, high sump level switches, and explosion-proof components; and air emission control and treatment systems, such as activated carbon units, catalytic oxidizers, or thermal oxidizers. Packed tower air strippers are installed either as permanent installations on concrete pads or on a skid or a trailer.

Who Needs a Permit?

 A Permit to Operate is required for each of the following equipment and operations:

The following air pollution control systems should be permitted within the remediation projects:

  • Carbon adsorption/HCL scrubbers/baghouses
  •  Natural gas/propane thermal oxidizers
  •  Internal Combustion (IC) engines/three-way catalytic converters
  •  Ozone injection systems or air sparge systems (unless exempt)

Permit Fees 

New Installations:

Soil/Water remediation projects are required to submit a one-time NEW APPLICATION fee for applying Authority to Construct/Permit to Operate (Form 400-General Application Fee Determination Sheet and Rule 300 District Fees).

Modification: 

Moving the remediation system to a different site is considered a different project, accordingly, the applicant shall pay the MODIFICATION fee specified in Rule 300.

Annual Renewal Fees:

Soil/water remediation which is limited to less than 25 pounds VOC emission per day, is billed a toxic fee and an emissions fees for a 0.1 to less than 1 ton per year emissions category.

All other remediation projects are billed a toxic fee and an emissions fees based upon 75% of the potential to emit, unless the operation is restricted by permit condition to a lower emissions category.  (Table 1, Section 4.4, Rule 301)

Permit Application Completeness Determination

 An application will not be accepted for processing until it is deemed complete. The following will be required in order for the Monterey Bay Air Resources District to make a completeness determination:

Documents/Forms

Advisory

Clarification of Permit Requirements for Soil Aeration Projects

Permit Application Forms

Form 1 ATC-PTO AplicationForm 400-General Application Fee Determination SheetContaminated Soil Remediation Equipment Supplemental Information Form

Annual Reporting Forms

Soil/Water Remediation Report

Related Rules

Rules

Rule 200 PERMITS REQUIRED

Rule 201 SOURCES NOT REQUIRING PERMITS

Rule 207 REVIEW OF NEW OR MODIFIED SOURCES

Rule 221 FEDERAL PREVENTION OF SIGNIFICANT DETERIORATION

Rule 222 FEDERAL MINOR SOURCES REVIEW

Rule 300 DISTRICT FEES

Rule 400 VISIBLE EMISSIONS

Rule 402 NUISANCES

Rule 403 PARTICULAR MATTER

Rule 436 TITLE V: GENERAL PROHIBITORY RULE

Rule 1000 PERMIT GUIDELINES AND REQUIREMENTS FOR SOURCES EMITTING TOXIC AIR CONTAMINANTS

California Health and Safety Code, Section 42301.6, Public Notice For Possible Source Of Air Hazardous Emissions Near School Prior To Approving Permit